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30+ things to do with eggshells — from: http://www.theprairiehomestead.com/

30+ Things to Do with Eggshells

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how to use eggshells

To the majority of people, eggshells are simply trash.

But to homesteader, eggshells are a surprisingly useful resource. You know what they say… “Waste not, want not.”

I personally get a big kick out of finding uses for things people normally throw away. So, I’ve put together a list of 9 Things You Can Do with Eggshells around your own homestead.

(Holy Moly! My list started out with a measly 9 ideas, but after all of my thrifty readers left their ideas in the comment section, it has grown to 30+! I’ve edited the list with these new additions- keep them coming folks!)

**It is very important to only use eggshells from healthy, natural chickens if you or your animals are going to ingest the shells. Eggs from factory farms are not only less nutritious, but can also carry harmful pathogens. I personally have no problem eating raw eggs from my own free-range hens, but I wouldn’t do so with eggs from the store.**

1. Feed them to your chickens.

Boost your flock’s calcium intake by crushing the shells and feeding them back to your hens. My girls much prefer crushed egg shells over the oyster shell supplement from the feed store. I wrote a post a while back that has all the details of collecting, crushing, and feeding the shells.

2. Use the shell’s membrane as an all-natural bandage.

I just discovered this idea, so I have yet to try it, but what a cool concept! The membrane of the shell is reported to help promote healing in cuts and scratches. This post should be able to answer most of your questions about using membranes as a first-aid tool.

uses for eggshells

3. Boil the eggshells in your coffee.

My first thought when I read this idea was ”Why on earth would you do that?” But apparently, people have been boiling eggshells in their coffee for centuries to help clarify the grounds and reduce bitterness. I have yet to give this a try myself, but it might be worth a try. Here is a Boiled Eggshell Coffee tutorial.

4. Sprinkle the eggshells around your garden to deter pests.

Soft-bodied critters like slugs or snails don’t like crawling over sharp pieces of eggshell.

5. Give your tomatoes a calcium boost.

Blossom-end rot is a common tomato problem, but I recently learned that it is actually caused by a calcium deficiency in the plant. Experienced gardeners often place eggshells in the bottom of the hole when transplanting their tomato plants to help combat this problem. I’m definitely trying this next year! For more natural gardening tips, grab a copy of my latest eBook, Natural Homestead. It has dozens of recipes to keep your garden chemical-free.

6. Eat them.

Yeah, I know. First I told you to eat your weeds, and now I’m saying to eat eggshells… Hey, I never claimed to be normal;)

But yes, many folks actually do eat eggshells for their awesome amounts of calcium.  I’ve never actually tried it, but I know that several of my readers have. This post will give you all the info you need to make your own calcium-rich eggshell powder.

7. Use eggshells to start seedlings.

If homemade paper pots aren’t your style, give some of your smaller seedlings a start in rinsed-out shells. This post from Apartment Therapy will give you all the info and photos you need to get you started.

8. Toss them in the compost pile.

Add calcium to your compost by adding eggshells to your pile or tumbler.

9. Sow directly into the soil.

If none of the previous idea sound appealing and you don’t have a compost pile, then you can simply turn crushed eggshells directly into your garden patch. It’s still better than sending them to the garbage.

uses for eggshells

All of the following ideas were submitted by readers of The Prairie Homestead:

10. Potting Soil Addition: Used coffee grounds and egg shells are wonderful in potted plants. I use a 1:4 ratio. (From Tala)

11. Blade Sharpening: Keep them in the freezer and use to clean and sharpen blender blades by adding water. Then pour the mixture into your compost bin. (From Greenie and Ceridwyn)

12. Canine Remedy: I save my eggshells and let them dry out, when I have a good size amount I crush them, then use a coffee grinder and make them into a powder. If one of my dogs get diarrhea, I just sprinkle a couple teaspoons of the eggshell powder on their food for a day and the diarrhea goes away. (From Terri)

13. Calcium Pills: I save my eggshells in a large bowl, then I steam them to sanitize them and let them dry. Then I grind them down (I use a Vitamix but I think any blender would do if you crush them a little first, or just do it in a coffee grinder) into a fine powder and spoon them into 00-size gelatin capsules for homemade calcium pills. (From Mari)

14. Mineral supplement: I sometimes soak eggshells in lemon water for a few weeks in the fridge. Then I add a tiny bit to my shakes to get extra minerals. (From Jill)

15. Tooth Remineralizing: Natural News.com has an article about using comfrey root & fresh egg shell (organic & pasture raised) for re-mineralizing your teeth.  Not sure about this particular method, but it would make sense due to the healing properties of the comfrey AND the minerals in the egg shell.  (From Jennifer)

16. Sidewalk chalk: 5-8 eggshells (finely ground), 1 tsp hot water, 1 tsp flour, food coloring optional…mix and pack into toilet tissue rolls and let dry. (From Linda) 

17. First Aid Treatment: Fresh egg membranes applied, then allowed to dry, will draw minor infections: splinters, pimples, boils, etc. (From Anne)

18. Making Water Kefir: You can also use eggshell to nourish your water kefir grains.  You just add 1/4 of a clean eggshell to your water kefir while it’s brewing.  We’ve done this instead of buying mineral drops and it seems to work great. (From Jenna, Sherry, and Tiffani)

19. Christmas Ornaments: When I found a large cache of slightly-flawed plastic suncatcher ornaments to paint cheap at the local flea market a few years ago, I snatched a big bunch of them up.  I mixed regular acrylic colors with Elmer’s glue and various “texturizing” elements to pack those suncatchers with.  I tried everything from small seeds and spices, to sifted sand, and my favorite turned out to be crushed eggshells.  They were no longer transparent, but the flaws were covered, and they make very nice Christmas tree ornaments, wall hangings, mobiles, etc. (From Sweetp)

20. Make Calcium Citrate: Make your own calcium citrate using only fresh farm raised, preferably organic, egg shells.  Rinse residual egg out of the shells and air dry. Crush the shell and add 1t. lemon juice per egg shell and cover.  The lemon juice will dissolve the shell and there you have it… calcium citrate. (From Mary Anne)

21. Calcium-Rich Vinegar: I was taught by my herbalist teacher to make a calcium rich vinegar by adding calcium rich herbs (nettles, dock, etc) and one clean high quality eggshell to apple cider vinegar.  It needs to infuse for at least six weeks, then be decanted.  But the calcium from the shell and the plants goes into the vinegar and can be used as regular vinegar would be in salad dressing, over cooked greens, etc.  (From Sara)

22. Pan Scrubber: Crushed egg shells work great to scrub pans that have food stuck in them. Yes they will break up, but they still do the job! (From Rose)

23. Ice Cream Addition (?): I was told companies put egg shell powder in cheap ice cream to add extra calcium.  I imagine you could do this when making homemade ice cream as well.(From Brenda)

24. Cosmetic Booster: Make it into a powder and add a little bit to your nail polish to strengthen nails. Take that same powder and put it into ice cube trays with water and rub it on your face– it helps reduce the look of wrinkles. Put the powder in your lotion– it softens your hands. (From Amy)

25. Add to Broth/Stocks: For extra calcium and minerals. (From Becky and Tiffani) (See my homemade stock/broth tutorial here.)

26. Arts and Crafts: Use eggshells to make mosaics or mixed-media art projects. (From Carol and Janet)

27. House Plant Booster: “My Grandmother kept eggshells covered with water in a mason jar which she used to water her African violets. She had the most magnificent plants imaginable!”(From Cynthia)

28. Wild Bird Treat: You can also feed them to the birds. They’re high in calcium and are great for birds in the spring when they are laying eggs– just make sure to sterilize them. Bake them in the oven for 20 minutes at 250 F and crush them. (From Susanne)

29. Laundry Whitener: To help your whites not to turn grey, put a handful of clean, broken eggshells and 2 slices of lemon in a little cheesecloth bag with your clothes in the washer. It will prevent the soap deposit that turns the white clothes grey. (From Emilie)

30. Garbage Disposal Cleaner: Toss a few shells down your disposal to help freshen things up. (From Carol) (Okay– since originally posting this, I’ve had several folks say this is a bad idea and that it will clog your drain– so proceed with caution…)

What do you do with eggshells?

HYDROGEN PEROXIDE MAGIC! — from: http://www.onegoodthingbyjillee.com/

I’m going to use Hydrogen Peroxide when washing fruit and vegetables from now on. I was using a wonderful Cider Vinegar, but Hydrogen Peroxide is far less expensive..  I’m going to put some in the dishwasher too, and then buy a sprayer so I can have it handy in the kitchen and bathroom… ET

uses-for-hydrogen-peroxide-1.22.13
This post is brought to you by Amazon where you can get deals on health & personal care products!

Ever since I started using Hydrogen Peroxide to get rid of armpit stains, to clean cookie sheets, as a miracle cleaner in my kitchen and bathroom, and to make my own “oxi clean”…I ALWAYShave at least one bottle of the stuff under my kitchen sink, under my bathroom sink, AND in the laundry room. This stuff is amazingly versatile!

But it wasn’t until recently, after doing some IN DEPTH research on the subject, that I came to realize what a “miracle substance” hydrogen peroxide really is! It’s safe, it’s readily available, it’s cheap, and best of all, it WORKS! It works for a LOT of stuff!

Hydrogen peroxide should really be called oxygen water, since it is basically the same chemical make up as water but with an extra oxygen atom (H2O2). Because of this it breaks down quickly and harmlessly into oxygen and water.

Some other interesting facts about hydrogen peroxide:

  • It is found in all living material.
  • Your white blood cells naturally produce hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to fight bacteria and infections.
  • Fruit and vegetables naturally produce hydrogen peroxide. This is one of the reasons why it is so healthy to eat fresh fruit and vegetables.
  • It is found in massive dosages in the mother’s first milk, called colostrum, and is transferred to the baby to boost their immune system.
  • It is found in rain water because some of the H20 in the atmosphere receives an additional oxygen atom from the ozone (O3) and this H2O2 makes plants grow faster.

Next to Apple Cider Vinegarhydrogen peroxide ranks up there as one of the best household remedies.

 

Besides the obvious (cleansing wounds), did you know that it is probably the best remedy to dissolve ear wax? Brighten dingy floors? Add natural highlights to your hair? Improve your plants root systems? The list goes on and on!

There are SO many uses for this stuff that I’ve started replacing the cap on the hydrogen peroxide bottle with a sprayer because it’s easier and faster to use that way.

uses for hydrogen peroxide

I have compiled a rather impressive list of uses for 3% hydrogen peroxide that I hope will have you as thrilled and bewildered as I was!

In no particular order…….I present…….

JILLEE’S BIG LIST OF USES FOR H2O2:

uses for hydrogen peroxide

Wash vegetables and fruits with hydrogen peroxide to remove dirt and pesticides. Add 1/4 cup of H2O2 to a sink of cold water. After washing, rinse thoroughly with cool water.

 

uses for hydrogen peroxide

In the dishwasher, add 2 oz. to your regular detergent for a sanitizing boost. Also, beef up your regular dish soap by adding roughly 2 ounces of 3% H2O2 to the bottle.

 

uses for hydrogen peroxide

Use hydrogen peroxide as a mouthwash to freshen breath. It kills the bacteria that causes halitosis. Use a 50/50 mixture of hydrogen peroxide and water.

 

uses for hydrogen peroxide

Use baking soda and hydrogen peroxide to make a paste for brushing teeth. Helps with early stages of gingivitis as it kills bacteria. Mixed with salt and baking soda, hydrogen peroxide works as a whitening toothpaste.

 

uses for hydrogen peroxide

Soak your toothbrush in hydrogen peroxide between uses to keep it clean and prevent the transfer of germs. This is particularly helpful when you or someone in your family has a cold or the flu.

 

uses for hydrogen peroxide

Clean your cutting board and countertop. Let everything bubble for a few minutes, then scrub and rinse clean. (I’ve been using it for this a LOT lately!)

 

uses for hydrogen peroxide

Wipe out your refrigerator and dishwasher. Because it’s non-toxic, it’s great for cleaning places that store food and dishes.

sponges

Clean your sponges. Soak them for 10 minutes in a 50/50 mixture of hydrogen peroxide and warm water in a shallow dish. Rinse the sponges thoroughly afterward.

 

uses for hydrogen peroxide

Remove baked-on crud from pots and pans. Combine hydrogen peroxide with enough baking soda to make a paste, then rub onto the dirty pan and let it sit for a while. Come back later with a scrubby sponge and some warm water, and the baked-on stains will lift right off.

 

uses for hydrogen peroxide

Whiten bathtub grout. First dry the tub thoroughly, then spray it liberally with hydrogen peroxide. Let it sit — it may bubble slightly — for a little while, then come back and scrub the grout with an old toothbrush. You may have to repeat the process a few times.

 

uses for hydrogen peroxide

Clean the toilet bowl. Pour half a cup of hydrogen peroxide into the toilet bowl, let stand for 20 minutes, then scrub clean.

 

uses for hydrogen peroxide

Remove stains from clothing, curtains, and tablecloths. Hydrogen peroxide can be used as a pre-treater for stains — just soak the stain for a little while in 3% hydrogen peroxide before tossing into the laundry. You can also add a cup of peroxide to a regular load of whites to boost brightness. It’s a green alternative to bleach, and works just as well.

 

uses for hydrogen peroxide

Brighten dingy floors. Combine half a cup of hydrogen peroxide with one gallon of hot water, then go to town on your flooring. Because it’s so mild, it’s safe for any floor type, and there’s no need to rinse.

 

uses for hydrogen peroxide

Clean kids’ toys and play areas. Hydrogen peroxide is a safe cleaner to use around kids, or anyone with respiratory problems, because it’s not a lung irritant. Spray toys, toy boxes, doorknobs, and anything else your kids touch on a regular basis.

 

uses for hydrogen peroxide

Help out your plants. To ward off fungus, add a little hydrogen peroxide to your spray bottle the next time you’re spritzing plants.

wet hair

Add natural highlights to your hair. Dilute the hydrogen peroxide so the solution is 50% peroxide and 50% water. Spray the solution on wet hair to create subtle, natural highlights.

 

uses for hydrogen peroxide

According to alternative therapy practitioners, adding half a bottle of hydrogen peroxide to a warm bath can help detoxify the body. Some are skeptical of this claim, but a bath is always a nice way to relax and the addition of hydrogen peroxide will leave you – and the tub – squeaky clean!

 

uses for hydrogen peroxide

Spray a solution of 1/2 cup water and 1 tablespoon of hydrogen peroxide on leftover salad, drain, cover and refrigerate. This will prevent wilting and better preserve your salad.

 

uses for hydrogen peroxide

Sanitize your kids’ lunch boxes/bags.

 

uses for hydrogen peroxide

Dab hydrogen peroxide on pimples or acne to help clear skin.

 

uses for hydrogen peroxide

Hydrogen peroxide helps to sprout seeds for new plantings. Use a 3% hydrogen peroxide solution once a day and spritz the seed every time you re-moisten. You can also use a mixture of 1 part hydrogen peroxide to 32 parts water to improve your plants’ root system.

 

uses for hydrogen peroxide

Remove yellowing from lace curtains or tablecloths. Fill a sink with cold water and a 2 cups of 3% hydrogen peroxide. Soak for at least an hour, rinse in cold water and air dry.

 

uses for hydrogen peroxide

Use it to remove ear wax. Use a solution of 3% with olive or almond oil. Add a couple drops of oil first then H2O2. After a few minutes, tilt head to remove solution and wax.

 

uses for hydrogen peroxide

Helps with foot fungus. Spray a 50/50 mixture of hydrogen peroxide and water on them (especially the toes) every night and let dry. Or try soaking your feet in a peroxide solution to help soften calluses and corns, and disinfect minor cuts.

 

uses for hydrogen peroxide

Spray down the shower with hydrogen peroxide to kill bacteria and viruses.

 

uses for hydrogen peroxide

Use 1 pint of 3% hydrogen peroxide to a gallon of water to clean humidifiers and steamers.

 

uses for hydrogen peroxide 31

Wash shower curtains with hydrogen peroxide to remove mildew and soap scum. Place curtains in machine with a bath towel and your regular detergent. Add 1 cup full strength 3% hydrogen peroxide to the rinse cycle.

 

uses for hydrogen peroxide

Use for towels that have become musty smelling. 1/2 cup Peroxide and 1/2 cup vinegar let stand for 15 minutes wash as normal. Gets rid of the smell.

 

uses for hydrogen peroxide

Use hydrogen peroxide to control fungi present in aquariums. Don’t worry, it won’t hurt your fish. Use sparingly for this purpose.

 

uses for hydrogen peroxide

De-skunking solution. Combine 1 quart 3% H2O2, 1/4 cup baking soda, 1 teaspoon Dawn dish detergent, 2 quarts warm water. (See Cynthia’s comment below)

 

Whew! That concludes MY list (for now at least!)……

 

what do YOU use hydrogen peroxide for?

21 Uses for Epsom Salt: From:http://wellnessmama.com/8509/21-uses-for-epsom-salt/

21 Uses for Epsom Salt

 

Uses for Epsom Salt 21 Uses for Epsom Salt

I am re-posting this because I  knew only a few of these uses so I need to have them here to remind us..

 

 

We use epsom salt (affiliate) a lot at our house. It is a good source of magnesium (here’s why we love magnesium) and has dozens of household uses. Here are our favorites:

  1. As a relaxing Magnesium Bath Soak – Add at least 1 cup of epsom salt to a warm bath and soak for 20 minutes.
  2. Splinter Removal- Soak in concentrated epsom salt water to pull out a splinter.
  3. Magnesium Foot Scrub- Make a homemade magnesium scrub (recipe here) for a boost of magnesium and super soft skin.
  4. Better Vegetables- Add a tablespoon of epsom salt to the soil below a tomato plant to boost growth.
  5. Facial Wash- Add a pinch of epsom salt to your usual face cleaner (or to your oil cleansing routine) for a skin exfoliating magnesium boost.
  6. Tile/Grout Cleaner- Mix equal parts of liquid dish soap and epsom salts and use to scrub tile and grout. Rinse well for a streak free shine.
  7. Body Aches- Add 2 cups of epsom salt to a warm bath and soak for at least 20 minutes to help relieve muscle sprains and for a transdermal magnesium boost.
  8. Homemade Sea Salt Spray- Make your own sea salt spray to add texture and volume to hair- recipe here.
  9. Water House Plants- Help house plants grow by adding a couple tablespoons of epsom salt to the water when you water them.
  10. Volumizing Hair Mask- Combine equal parts of conditioner and epsom salt and leave on hair for 20 minutes. Rinse well and let air dry for thicker hair.
  11. Foot Soak- For a concentrated magnesium boost, add 1 cup of epsom salt to a hot foot soak and soak for 20 minutes.
  12. Get rid of slugs- Have slugs in your garden or on your patio? Sprinkle epsom salt to deter them.
  13. Making Magnesium Lotion- Using magnesium flakes is a better option, but in a pinch, you can use epsom salt to make homemade magnesium oil (recipe here).
  14. Laxative- For occasional constipation, a teaspoon of epsom salt dissolved in water can help. Check with a doctor first.
  15. Beautiful Roses- Add a tablespoon a week to the soil around rose bushes before watering for faster growth.
  16. Soil Prep- Before planting, we add a few bags of epsom salt to the soil in the garden and water in to help replenish soil magnesium levels.
  17. Headache relief- There is evidence that soaking in a soothing epsom salt bath may help relieve headache.
  18. Smooth skin- Mix 1/2 cup epsom salt with 1/4 cup olive oil and scrub skin in the shower for healthy and smooth skin.
  19. Itchy Skin or Bug Bites- Dissolve a tablespoon of epsom salt in to 1/2 cup of water and cool. Spritz on itchy skin or apply a wet compress to help relieve itching.
  20. Minor Sunburn Relief- Use the same ratio in the itchy skin relief above and spritz on to minor sunburns to help soothe them.
  21. Help Kids Sleep Better- Add a cup to kids’ bath water before bed to help them sleep peacefully..

How do you use epsom salt? Share your tips below!

8 Homemade Makeup Tutorials — from: http://www.naturallivingideas.com/8-homemade-makeup-tutorials/

8 Homemade Makeup Tutorials

Want to be notified each time we publish a new blog post? Then make sure you like Natural Living Ideas on Facebook here where we share not only our blog posts, but the best natural living ideas from around the web.

8 Homemade Makeup Tutorials

Many of the cosmetics we apply on our face, lips and around our eyes are packed full of harmful chemicals, many of which have been linked to cancer. A number of cosmetic companies also have loose morals with a large proportion of them still testing their products on animals.  Plus, store bought makeup can be outrageously expensive considering how easy it is to make your own makeup at home.

This blog post will reveal how you can throw away every item of makeup you own and replace it with natural homemade alternatives…

Homemade Lipstick – This is a really simple recipe that can be customized with different colors by using beetroot powder for red hues or cocoa powder for brown hues. You can also add custom scents with a few drops of essential oil. Get the full tutorial at WellnessMama.com here.

8 Homemade Makeup TutorialsHomemade Foundation – This foundation uses a base of arrowroot powder plus a combination of cocoa powder, ground cinnamon and nutmeg to customize the color. It’s really easy to make and helps to smooth out any blemishes. Find out how to make it at ThankYourBody.com here.

Homemade Translucent Powder – This is really easy. You simply have to mix three very cheap and natural ingredients together (cornstarch, French green clay and cocoa) and you have a natural translucent powder ready to apply on your face! To find out the exact measurements and to get full instructions, visit GreatOakCircle.com here.

Homemade Blush – This is an easy to adjust recipe so you can customize it to work perfectly with your skin type. Like the foundation recipe, this blush uses arrowroot as a base and requires the addition of hibiscus powder and cinnamon to customize the color. Find outhow to make it at ThankYourBody.com here.

Homemade Bronzer – Give your face a healthy glow with this DIY bronzer recipe. It’s slightly more complex than the previous tutorials but it works great for your skin! Find out how to make it at HumbleBeeAndMe.com here.

8 Homemade Makeup TutorialsHomemade Eyeliner & Eyeshadow – This DIY eyeliner and eyeshadow uses just one ingredient (activated charcoal) and water to create the easiest and cheapest eyeliner ever made – but it still works great. Get thefull tutorial at ABlossomingLife.com here.

Homemade Mascara – This DIY mascara is made from coconut oil, aloe vera gel, grated beeswax and activated charcoal. It works just as well as store bought mascara but without the dangerous chemicals and the high price tag. Get the full tutorial at ThankYourBody.com here.

Homemade Makeup Remover Wipes – It’s no use applying all natural makeup if you are simply going to wipe it off with chemical packed wipes. Instead make these all natural makeup remover wipes and keep your face chemical free. Get the full tutorial at OneGoodThingByJille.com here.

Ditch your cosmetics, save money, reduce the toxic load on your skin and make your own all natural makeup at home!

7 Natural Cleaning Cheats That Will Rock Your World

From: http://www.naturallivingideas.com/7-natural-cleaning-cheats/

Want to be notified each time we publish a new blog post? Then make sure you like Natural Living Ideas on Facebook here where we share not only our blog posts, but the best natural living ideas from around the web.

7 Natural Cleaning Cheats That Will Rock Your World

No one really likes cleaning… do they?

This blog post aims to arm you with the knowledge to make cleaning your home so much easier, so much cheaper, and without any of the harmful chemicals.

These seven cheats will help you remove carpet stains with one simple ingredient, remove grease stains from laundry, clean icky pans without all the scrubbing, remove hard water stains in your bathroom, fix wood scratches in furniture and so much more.

So without further ado, here are seven natural cleaning hacks that will rock your world…

1. How To Remove Hard Water Stains With A Lemon

Half a lemon works more powerfully than any commercially available chemical cleaners when it comes to clearing away hard water stains in your bathroom. Simply slice a lemon in half and rub the open fruit on the stains, rinse away and admire your brand new sparkling bathroom! To see before and after photos, plus more bathroom cleaning tricks, visit BroccoliCupcake.com here.

2. How To Remove Carpet Stains With Hydrogen Peroxide

This simple trick requires just two materials: hydrogen peroxide and a damp cloth and will clear away those set in stains from your carpet in no time with no harmful chemicals required. To find out how this works and to see before and after photos, visit DIYConfessions.com here.

3. How To Clean Icky Pans With Castile Soap

Castile soap is an ingredient with so many uses and this method for cleaning “icky” pans is one of the best. Just squeeze a little onto your pan and start scrubbing – but you won’t need to scrub as much as if you were using plain old dish soap. Soon your pan will look shiny, clean and brand new again! You can see full instructions and before and after photos here.

4. How To Remove Grease Stains From Clothes

Grease stains are one of the most common, but also one of the most difficult stains to get out. This fantastic trick which involves simply adding a few drops of eucalyptus essential oil onto the grease stain works wonders and can help return some of your favorite clothes to their former glory. To find out how this works and to see before and after photos, visit CreativeChristianMama.com here.

5. How To Remove Paint Spills & Splatters With Rubbing Alcohol

Spilling or splatting paint seems to happen to me every time I pick up a paint brush, so I’m thankful that it’s so easy to remove paint spills simply using rubbing alcohol. You simply need a paper towel and some rubbing alcohol and then you scrub. To find out how this works and to see before and after photos, visit CreeklineHouse.com here.

6. How To Clean Your Oven Without Harsh Chemicals

Cleaning your oven is one of those chores that just keeps getting put off… and off… and off! But with this simple method oven cleaning won’t be such a chore and you won’t have to use any harmful chemicals! It requires just baking soda and water and requires very little elbow grease. To find out how and to see before and after photos, visit LiveRenewed.com.

7. How To Fix Scratches In Wood With Two Simple Ingredients

Wood scratches can really ruin a piece of beautiful furniture – but they are incredibly easy to get rid of! Using a simple mixture of olive oil and vinegar you can quickly remove wood scratches and have your furniture looking brand new again! Find out how this works and see before and after photos at DomesticBlissSquared.com

These seven cleaning cheats are so simple, so cheap and totally natural. I can’t promise they will make you enjoy household cleaning, but I can promise you that it will make it quicker!

DIY: fix scratches in wood furniture

DIY: fix wood scratches

A few weeks ago I read this post at Lily & Thistle about a DIY for fixing scratched furniture. It seemed too good to be true! She claimed that she used a mixture of 1/4 cup vinegar and 3/4 cup olive oil and magically got rid of the scratches in a piece of thrift store furniture.

I knew I was going to try it, though! See, I have this table:

DIY fix scratches in wood furniture

my preciousssss…

My husband hates it, but I just adore it! I have a small large obsession for vintage modern furniture, and this is one of my favorite pieces I’ve collected (He calls them my “ugly grandpa furniture.” What does he know about style? Bah!). But in this case, he’s kind of right. As much as I love it, it’s in really bad shape on the top. Check it out:

DIY fix scratches in wood furniture

I’ve tried furniture polish and orange oil, and nothing really makes it look much better. It was sitting forlornly in our garage waiting for me to decide if it was worth keeping, so I figured I’d give this magical trick a try as a last ditch effort.

I mixed about 1/2 cup vinegar with 1/2 cup of olive oil, because I didn’t have enough Olive Oil and it still worked! Check it out:

fix scratches in wood furniture

I took a kitchen rag and just dipped it in and rubbed it on. I kept going until I had gone over the whole table and used almost all of the mixture. I was shocked! It really worked! The scratches were fixed! My “grandpa table” now looks like this:

DIY fix for scratches in wood furniture

Let’s just do a little side by side comparison, shall we? I think this deserves it’s own montage. Try and imagine Rocky music in your head for me as we watch the transformation:

DIY fix wood scratches

How To Make An “Herbal Home Remedy” Kit : also: Banana Peel for great skin..

Go to the Underground Health page:: —  http://www.undergroundhealth.com/how-to-make-an-herbal-home-remedy-kit/

In addition I will share that every time I eat a banana, I take part of the skin and rub the inside of the peel all over my face and hands. If I using them in a recipe and have a few peels I made this concoction:

Ingredients:

Banana peels

Filtered water

Lemon juice..

Directions:

Cut peel into small pieces and add about 2 Tablespoons of filtered water in the large Magic Bullet jar.

Mix until nearly smooth.

Add the juice of one lemon. Continue mixing until smooth..

Apply to your face and hands..

Store thr rest in a clean glass jar in the refrigerator.. It will keep for a few days..

Then eat another banana and make a new batch..

If you want you may cut up the peels and freeze them to make a body moisturizer at a later date.. 

A fine page to find many natural causes for Herbs, Health, and Happiness

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Herbs-Health-and-Happiness/468118629901734

This page has a large number of  Herbal, Healthy options instead of using many expensive drugs…etc…

They direct you to other sites for more detail and recipes..

GRAB LIFE BY THE LEMONS: 10 WAYS TO USE CITRUS AT HOME : from :: https://brightnest.com

Date: April 07 2013 | Author: Ashley | Category: Clean

When life “hands you lemons,” you can do a lot more than make lemonade. With dozens of simple, non-toxic uses for lemon around the house, this yellow citrus is a great item to add to your grocery list and a powerful cleaning agent. If you want to get more from this versatile fruit, check out ten of our favorite uses for lemons:

1. Clean your glass. To give your windows and mirrors a streak-free shine, all you need are some boiled lemon rinds and a coffee filter!

2. Freshen a humidifier. If your humidifier is starting to smell a little stale, freshen up the aroma by adding a few teaspoons of lemon juice to the water. Your home will smell fresh – and have the perfect level of humidity!

3. Eco-friendly air fresheners. Want a fresher smelling kitchen? Simmer a combination of lemon zest, cinnamon and baking soda in a pot to eliminate stubborn odors from last night’s dinner (or the trashcan).

4. Clean copper. If your copper needs a quick shine, grab a lemon and some salt. Microwave your lemon for ten seconds, and then cut it in half. Dip the juicy side of the lemon into the salt, then vigorously rub your copper. The stains will disappear and your copper will shine like a new penny!

5. Tackle soap scum. If you want to be a soap scum ninja, squeeze lemon juice directly onto the stubborn scum, let sit for a few minutes and wipe away the mess with ease.

6. Remove ants. If ants have invaded your space, reach for lemons instead of a chemical-based spray. Boil a handful of lemon peels with one cup of water, then slowly pour the solution over any anthills to get rid of them.

7. Clean your garbage disposal. To get rid of that garbage disposal funk, all you need is one lemon, a few teaspoons of baking soda and 60 seconds of free time.

8. Polish furniture.  If you’re looking for a fresh-smelling, all-natural furniture polish, mix one-part lemon juice with two-parts olive oil. Massage the mixture into your furniture for a smooth, shiny finish.

9. Erase ink spots. If your pocket protector failed you, erase those nasty ink spots with lemon juice! Douse the stain with the citrus as soon as you can, and then wash it in a cold cycle.

10. Quench your thirst. You’ve worked hard, reward yourself! Dirty up a glass, add lemon juice, tequila and honey. Repeat as necessary.

mizzeliz comment: I do not recommend # 10 as it reads.. Skip the tequila, and start another project: