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Sausage and Eggs to Go

Sausage and Eggs to Go

ScreenShot2013 09 20at95114AMThe following recipe is pulled straight from the pages of the new Primal Blueprint Publishing publication Primal Cravings. Authors Brand and Megan Keatley really know how make delicious Primal dishes, and often with surprisingly few ingredients. This recipe doesn’t disappoint on both counts. Start day 13 of your 21 day challenge off right and give this recipe a try today. Now, enter Brandon and Megan…

A big problem with making a good go at Primal eating is breakfast. The reason is twofold. One, we’re all so used to standard American breakfast fare of the last 30 years (processed carbs and sugar, think: cereal, bagels, pastries, juice) and two, it’s early and you have a job or class or something to get to, who has time to cook?


We’ve got a recipe that’s really helped people to solve both of those problems. Our Sausage and Eggs to Go is a delicious, convenient, and most importantly portable option for Primal breakfast. These can be made ahead of time and reheat really well, which is difficult to do with other egg recipes. Try them plain or with some yellow mustard.

A solid recipe as-is. You could also use this recipe as a base for endless variations. Try sautéing mushrooms and onions or bell peppers and ham, then adding them into whisked eggs.

Serves: 6


  • 1 pound Breakfast Sausage (from page 264 if you own a copy of the book, or store bought)
  • 6 eggs
  • 1 green onion, sliced
  • Salt to taste


Preheat oven to 350°F.

Divide the sausage into 6 portions, and place each into its own individual ramekin. Use your hands to push the sausage around the bottom and up the sides of the ramekin, creating a “crust” for the egg to bake in.

Crack an egg into each sausage crust. For a scrambled variation, whisk the eggs before pouring in.

Top with a sprinkle of salt and a few slices of green onion.

Bake until the eggs are set, about 30 minutes.

ScreenShot2013 09 20at93405AM

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Read more: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/sausage-and-eggs-to-go/#ixzz2gQyweBii



Step 1

Preheat oven to 400 degrees, set aside an un-
greased baking sheet.

Step 2

In a large mixing bowl combine flours, baking powder and xanthan gum; cut in butter with pastry blender.

Step 3

In another bowl mix together the honey, eggs, grated lemon peel, lemon juice and water. Add liquid mixture to the dry ingredients and stir with fork.

Step 4

Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead 10 times. Pat dough into round shape 1″ thick and brush with lemon juice; sprinkle with 1 tablespoon of granulated sugar. Cut into wedges and place edges onto baking sheet and bake for 30 minutes.

Makes 8 scones.

Lemon Coconut Cream Scones Recipe

Heat oven to 425 degrees farenheit.

2 C All-Purpose Gluten-free Flour
1 Tbsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 c sugar
1 1/4 C (unsweetened) coconut cream or coconut milk
zest of one lemon or orange

Combine all the dry ingredients. Add the citrus zest to the liquid. Mix the coconut cream into the dry ingredients until it barely holds together. (If the dough seems at all dry, or it isn’t coming together quickly, add more coconut cream and quickly mix it in.) Flour your hands with white rice flour. Pour out the dough onto a floured surface, then press it together as gently as possible until it just comes together in a thick disk. Cut into eight equal pieces, carefully transfer them to a baking sheet, sprinkle with sugar, and bake for 8 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into them comes out clean.

Enjoy your gluten-free dairy-free scones! Feel free to top the scones with a citrus glaze, but I think these stand well on their own.


No dairy used here!

  • 1/3 cup White Bean Flour :::    I grind my own
  • n1/4 tsp Garlic salt (Premium) ::: I would use a few cloves of garlic and probably No Salt or a Half Salt.
  • 1/2 tsp Basil (Imported) ::: or Fresh from my Garden
  • 2 Tb Vegetable Soup Base ::: I have some home made in the freezer..
  • 1 cup Finely Chopped Celery ::: or Celeriac
  • 3 cups Boiling Water
  • 1/2 cup Onion, chopped
  • 4 cups Fresh Broccoli, chopped ::: fresh or frozen


In a large saucepan combine all but the bean flour. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer covered for 15 minutes or until broccoli is tender. In a blender, blend 1/3 of the soup mixture and bean flour at a time until smooth. Return to saucepan and cook an additional 5 minutes.

Makes 3 Servings.

Modified Garlic Soup Recipe

I will make this as soon as I get some more garlic…

Serves 4

26 garlic cloves (unpeeled)
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons (1/4 stick) organic butter (grass fed)
1/2 teaspoon cayenne powder
1/2 cup fresh ginger
2 1/4 cups sliced onions
1 1/2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme
26 garlic cloves, peeled
1/2 cup coconut milk
3 1/2 cups organic vegetable broth
4 lemon wedges

Preheat oven to 350F. Place 26 garlic cloves in small glass baking dish. Add 2 tablespoons olive oil and sprinkle with sea salt and toss to coat. Cover baking dish tightly with foil and bake until garlic is golden brown and tender, about 45 minutes. Cool. Squeeze garlic between fingertips to release cloves. Transfer cloves to small bowl.

Melt butter in heavy large saucepan over medium-high heat. Add onions, thyme, ginger and cayenne powder and cook until onions are translucent, about 6 minutes. Add roasted garlic and 26 raw garlic cloves and cook 3 minutes. Add vegetable broth; cover and simmer until garlic is very tender, about 20 minutes. Working in batches, puree soup in blender until smooth. Return soup to saucepan; add coconut milk and bring to simmer. Season with sea salt and pepper for flavour.

Squeeze juice of 1 lemon wedge into each bowl and serve.

Can be prepared 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate. Rewarm over medium heat, stirring occasionally.

If garlic were found to be a wonder drug, consumers could simply buy it in the supermarket for 30p a bulb or grow their own in the garden.

Nevertheless, garlic has a long and proud tradition as a medicine. The Ancient Egyptians recommended it for 22 ailments. In a papyrus dated 1500BC, the labourers who built the pyramids ate it to increase their stamina and keep them healthy.

The Ancient Greeks advocated garlic for everything from curing infections, and lung and blood disorders to healing insect bites and even treating leprosy.

The Romans fed it to soldiers and sailors to improve their endurance. Dioscorides, the personal physician to Emperor Nero, wrote a five-volume treatise extolling its virtues.

One of the most interesting of the recent findings is that garlic increases the overall antioxidant levels of the body. Scientifically known as Allium sativa, garlic has been famous throughout history for its ability to fight off viruses and bacteria. Louis Pasteur noted in 1858 that bacteria died when they were doused with garlic. From the Middle Ages on, garlic has been used to treat wounds, being ground or sliced and applied directly to wounds to inhibit the spread of infection. The Russians refer to garlic as Russian penicillin.

More recently, researchers have unearthed evidence to show garlic may help us to stay hale and hearty in a number of ways.


Last June, nutrition scientists at the University of Florida found eating garlic can boost the number of T-cells in the bloodstream. These play a vital role in strengthening our immune systems and fighting viruses.

And pharmacologists at the University of California found that allicin — the active ingredient in garlic that contributes to bad breath — is an infection-killer.

Allicin also makes our blood vessels dilate, improving blood flow and helping to tackle cardiovascular problems such as high cholesterol.

An Australian study of 80 patients published last week in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition reported that diets high in garlic may reduce high blood pressure.

In 2007, dentists in Brazil found that gargling with garlic water (made by steeping crushed garlic cloves in warm, but not boiling, water) can kill the germs that cause tooth decay and gum disease.

But they hit a snag: the volunteers refused to continue the experiment, complaining that the garlic gargle made them feel sick. Looking at the garlic soup recipe certainly made me feel queasy. Still, it gave me an excuse to use up my ample supply of garlic.

Though last year’s awful weather caused crop failures on my allotment, I enjoyed a bumper harvest of garlic.

Among its many other virtues, garlic kills slugs and snails. Researchers from the University of Newcastle believe it contains oils that may cripple the nervous systems of these slimy creatures.

There are two schools of thought as to the best way of preparing garlic to make the most of its medicinal qualities.

Argentinian investigators found it releases its allicin-type compounds when you bake the cloves, while scientists at South Carolina Medical University believe peeling garlic and letting it sit uncovered for 15 minutes produces the highest levels of compounds to fight infection.

So you can simply peel half of the garlic cloves and roast the other half with the kitchen door tightly closed (to stop the pong permeating throughout the house).

After an hour-and-a-quarter’s industrious soup-making, sprinkle lemon juice over a bowl of steaming, grey gloop and tuck in.

The heady aroma certainly revs up the appetite and the first spoonful does not disappoint. Delicious as it is, however, one large bowl of home-made soup is a more than ample meal.

As for the soup’s cold-preventing powers, only time will tell. Regular bowlfuls may very well keep me free of winter ailments, thanks to the virus-killing compounds they contain.

Or it could just be that my nuclear-strength garlic breath will keep everyone who is infectious far out of sneezing range for months to come.



A recent and significant finding from Washington State University shows that garlic is 100 times more effective than two popular antibiotics at fighting disease causing bacteria commonly responsible for food borne illness.

When the garlic is crushed, alliin becomes allicin. Research shows that allicin helps lower cholesterol and blood pressure and also helps prevents blood clots. Garlic can also reduce the risk of developing atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries). Compounds in this familiar bulb kill many organisms, including bacteria and viruses that cause earaches, flu and colds. Research indicates that garlic is also effective against digestive ailments and diarrhea. What’s more, further studies suggest that this common and familiar herb may help prevent the onset of cancers.

‘This chemical has been known for a long time for its anti-bacterial and anti-fungal powers,’ says Helen Bond, a Derbyshire-based consultant dietitian and spokeswoman for the British Dietetic Association.

‘Because of this, people assume it is going to boost their immune systems. Lots of people are simply mashing up garlic, mixing it with olive oil and spreading it on bread.

‘But how or whether it may actually work has still not been proven categorically.’

Indeed, scientists remain divided on garlic’s ability to combat colds and flu. Last March, a major investigation by the respected global research organisation, the Cochrane Database, found that increasing your garlic intake during winter can cut the duration of cold symptoms — from five-and-a-half days to four-and-a-half.

But the report, which amalgamated all previous scientific studies on garlic, said it could not draw solid conclusions because there is a lack of large-scale, authoritative research.

The problem is that pharmaceutical companies are not interested in running huge, expensive trials — as they would with promising new drug compounds — because there is nothing in garlic that they can patent, package and sell at a profit.





Sausage Minestrone Soup… Great for a cool winter’s night…

1 qt low sodium chicken broth

2 Cups water

2 Tbsp Tomato Paste

1  chopped onion..

2-6 cloves of chopped garlic depending on your taste..

1 cup carrots or parsnips chopped small..

1 can (14 oz) Cannellini beans..

1/2 cups chopped celery or Celeriac..

1  can 28 oz diced tomatoes..

1 Bay leaf..

1/2 tsp dried Thyme..

1/2 dried Basil..

1 LB Hot or mild sausage  cut up and casings removed or use bulk sausage..

2 Cups cut up Kale, Swiss Chard, or Spinach..

2 cups Cooked  Orecchiette, Orzo ,  Rice,  Quinoa, etc.. Pick one or combine two..

In a slow cooker combine chicken broth, water, tomato paste, onion, garlic, celery, cannellini beans, salt, tomatoes, Bay leaf, thyme, and basil.

In a nonstick skillet saute sausage breaking it into small pieces until browned, about 5 min. Drain on a paper towel lined paper plate. Then add to the slow cooker. Cover and cook on high 4 hours. Stir in Kale, Swiss Chard, or Spinach, and whatever pasta rice, or Quinoa you have chosen..  makes about 12 cups…

You mat add whatever other spices you desire and or more  chopped vegetables. Summer squash, zucchini, pumpkin, other squash,  cut green beans, or a can of chic peas  to taste..  You may need more water or broth if you add more vegetables.. Also cook the pasta, rice, or Quinoa in a vegetable or chicken broth.. I make broth ahead and store it in the freezer until I need it…

Serve this with bread dipped in spiced Olive Oil, or your favorite crackers…



How to germinate osage orange

Read on the Internet, fill a bucket (or container)full of fallen Osage Oranges, and some water, and leave them set out all winter (Ohio). In the spring they’ll be brown and squashy. Mix them up into a slurry, dig a furrow about 1-1 1/2 deep, and pour in the slurry, cover with about a 1/2″ of dirt. Tried this last year 2009-2010 and had plenty of germination. Furrow was about 8′ long and probably had 100 seedlings, and this is in hard clay.

I’ve been growing them for two years, and I’ve had great luck. I collect the fruit September – November: I choose big, healthy-looking fruit that has fallen from the tree. Then I leave it on my deck in a plastic tray or box, letting the freeze-thaw cycles do the work for me.
Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
Eventually, the fruit becomes soft enough to be separated easily. Pull good seeds from the middle of the fruit.I planted my seeds about a half-inch under the soil in various containers. All of them came up. However, I remember that I planted them early, and they didn’t sprout for what I thought was a long time. I also planted far too many seeds – which meant that I had to select the best seedlings and scrap or transplant the rest. I tried separating, but my transplanted seedlings all wilted.

My best plants, interestingly, came from a chunk of fruit that I tossed into a pot of old soil and oak leaves (the pot had a chainfern in it originally). Anyhow, two really vigorous volunteers sprouted up late, grew about a foot and a half, and held their leaves well into fall. One plant has thorns, one doesn’t. This winter, I carefully separated the plants (one for my sister, one for me), unbound their bright orange roots, and re-potted them. Now, they are both putting out new leaves! I have an experimental runt osage, too, that is sprouting. If it stays compact, it’ll become a bonsai.

So, my advice: give them plenty of room to grow (one gallon or better), and watch them for sunburn. You should have a lot of success.

Honey Mustard Chicken & Roasted Potatoes : from ‘High Protein Foods’

1 whole chicken, defrosted
1/3 cup grainy mustard
1/3 cup honey
1/3 cup olive oil
1/4 cup butter, softened

3 lbs red potatoes, chopped into 1/2 in. pieces
1 large yellow onion, chopped
1/2 cup olive oil
1/2 Tbs salt
1/2 Tbs black pepper

Put whole chicken in slow cooker. In a small bowl, whisk together mustard, honey, olive oil, and butter, and pour over chicken. Set slow cooker on HIGH for 6 hours or LOW for 8 hours. Remove from slow cooker and pour some of the leftover juices over the chicken to serve.

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Grease a 9×13 inch baking dish. Put potatoes, onions, olive oil, salt, and pepper into baking dish and stir together. Bake for about an hour, or until potatoes are golden brown and crispy, stirring every 15 minutes.

Serves 4.

Photo: Honey Mustard Chicken & Roasted Potatoes</p>
<p>Ingredients:<br />
1 whole chicken, defrosted<br />
1/3 cup grainy mustard<br />
1/3 cup honey<br />
1/3 cup olive oil<br />
1/4 cup butter, softened</p>
<p>3 lbs red potatoes, chopped into 1/2 in. pieces<br />
1 large yellow onion, chopped<br />
1/2 cup olive oil<br />
1/2 Tbs salt<br />
1/2 Tbs black pepper</p>
<p>Directions:<br />
Put whole chicken in slow cooker. In a small bowl, whisk together mustard, honey, olive oil, and butter, and pour over chicken. Set slow cooker on HIGH for 6 hours or LOW for 8 hours. Remove from slow cooker and pour some of the leftover juices over the chicken to serve. </p>
<p>Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Grease a 9x13 inch baking dish. Put potatoes, onions, olive oil, salt, and pepper into baking dish and stir together.  Bake for about an hour, or until potatoes are golden brown and crispy, stirring every 15 minutes. </p>
<p>Serves 4.

Lasagna Soup: from ‘High Protein Foods’s’ see note for pasta Free version

For the soup:
2 tsp. olive oil
1-1/2 lbs. Italian sausage
3 c. chopped onions
4 garlic cloves, minced
2 tsp. dried oregano
1/2 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes
2 T. tomato paste
1 28-oz. can fire roasted diced tomatoes
2 bay leaves
6 c. chicken stock
8 oz. mafalda or fusilli pasta
1/2 c. finely chopped fresh basil leaves
salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

for the cheesy yum:
8 oz. ricotta
1/2 c. grated Parmesan cheese
1/4 tsp. salt
pinch of freshly ground pepper
additional cheesy yum:

2 c. shredded mozzarella cheese

Heat olive oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add sausage, breaking up into bite sized pieces, and brown for about 5 minutes. Add onions and cook until softened, about 6 minutes. Add garlic, oregano, and red pepper flakes. Cook for 1 minute. Add tomato paste and stir well to incorporate. Cook for 3 to 4 minutes, or until the tomato paste turns a rusty brown color.

Add diced tomatoes, bay leaves, and chicken stock. Stir to combine. Bring to a boil and then reduce heat and simmer for 30 minutes. Add uncooked pasta and cook until al dente. Do not over cook or let soup simmer for a long period of time at this point, as the pasta will get mushy and absorb all the soup broth. You may even want to consider cooking the noodles separately, and then adding some to individual bowls before ladling the soup over them. This would be an especially smart move if you are anticipating any leftovers. Right before serving, stir in the basil and season to taste with salt and freshly ground black pepper.

While the pasta is cooking, prepare the cheesy yum. In a small bowl, combine the ricotta, Parmesan, salt, and pepper.

To serve, place a dollop of the cheesy yum in each soup bowl, sprinkle some of the mozzarella on top and ladle the hot soup over the cheese.

If you want a pasta free recipe you could slices if summer squash and/or zucchini and a couple of tablespoons of Cannellini Bean flour or a can of cooked Cannellini beans(do not drain)..

Hair Beauty Secrets from Your Kitchen!

Healthy Hair ! Look to your kitchen for the BEST conditioners to moisturize and revitalize your hair!
Four different masks for each type of hair that you can easily make in minutes using all-natural ingredients you probably have sitting in your refrigerator or cupboard right now!…

DRY hair –Olive Oil and Egg
In need of some major TLC?? Combine three tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil with two eggs and apply the mixture to your hair and let the mixture sit for 20 minutes before rinsing in the shower.
The olive oil will help hydrate brittle locks, while the protein in the eggs will promote healthy hair growth.

ALL HAIR TYPES — Avocado and Honey
Mask a ripened avocado and mix in a tablespoon of organic honey and allow it to sit for 20 minutes before rinsing it off in the shower.
Avocados are rich in a variety of vitamins and nutrients, including vitamin E and protein, both of which your hair needs to remain soft and healthy. Meanwhile, honey is a natural antibacterial agent.

OILY hair — Apple Cider Vinegar and Lemon
Combine 1/4 cup of apple cider vinegar with the grated peel of an entire lemon and allow it to set for 15 minutes to absorb the excess oil from your scalp, and then rinse in the shower.
Apple cider vinegar will remove build up from styling products and conditioners and strengthen the hair shaft, leaving you with soft, shiny strands. It will also balance hair’s pH level, kill bacteria, and is a cure for dandruff.

DRY, flaky scalp hair — Banana, Honey and Almond
Mash together 1/2 a ripe banana and add two tablespoons of honey and a few drops of almond oil and allow it to set with a shower cap on for 20 minutes before rinsing.
Bananas can increase the moisture of your hair, smooth frizz and soothe your itchy scalp.

Choose the one that fits you better and bring your hair back to life!! There is no need to buy the priciest conditioners on the market to moisturize and revitalize your hair.

YOU must ASK for your discount !

Applebee’s: 15% off with Golden Apple Card (60+)
Arby’s: 10% off ( 55 +)
Ben & Jerry’s: 10% off (60+)
Bennigan’s: discount varies by location (60+)
Bob’s Big Boy: discount varies by location (60+)
Boston Market: 10% off (65+)
Burger King: 10% off (60+)
Chick-Fil-A: 10% off or free small drink or coffee ( 55+)
Chili’s: 10% off ( 55+)
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Denny’s: 10% off, 20% off for AARP members ( 55 +)
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Long John Silver’s: various discounts at locations ( 55+)
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Mrs. Fields: 10% off at participating locations (60+)
Shoney’s: 10% off
Sonic: 10% off or free beverage (60+)
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Whataburger: 10% off (62+)
White Castle: 10% off (62+) This is for me … if I ever see one again.

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Big Lots: 30% off
Bon-Ton Department Stores: 15% off on senior discount days ( 55 +)
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Hallmark: 10% off one day a week (date varies by location)
Kmart: 40% off (Wednesdays only) ( 50+)
Kohl’s: 15% off (60+)Modell’s Sporting Goods: 30% off
Rite Aid: 10% off on Tuesdays & 10% off prescriptions
Ross Stores: 10% off every Tuesday ( 55+)
The Salvation Army Thrift Stores: up to 50% off ( 55+)
Stein Mart: 20% off red dot/clearance items first Monday of every month ( 55 +)

Albertson’s: 10% off first Wednesday of each month ( 55 +)
American Discount Stores: 10% off every Monday ( 50 +)
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DeCicco Family Markets: 5% off every Wednesday (60+)
Food Lion: 60% off every Monday (60+)
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Gristedes Supermarket: 10% off every Tuesday (60+)
Harris Teeter: 5% off every Tuesday (60+)
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Kroger: 10% off (date varies by location)
Morton Williams Supermarket: 5% off every Tuesday (60+)
The Plant Shed: 10% off every Tuesday ( 50 +)
Publix: 15% off every Wednesday ( 55 +)
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Uncle Guiseppe’s Marketplace: 15% off (62+)

Alaska Airlines: 50% off (65+)
American Airlines: various discounts for 50% off non-peak periods (Tuesdays – Thursdays) (62+)and up (call before booking for discount)
Continental Airlines: no initiation fee for Continental Presidents Club & special fares for select destinations
Southwest Airlines: various discounts for ages 65 and up (call before booking for discount)
United Airlines: various discounts for ages 65 and up (call before booking for discount)
U.S. Airways: various discounts for ages 65 and up (call before booking for discount)
Amtrak: 15% off (62+)
Greyhound: 15% off (62+)
Trailways Transportation System: various discounts for ages 50+

Car Rental:
Alamo Car Rental: up to 25% off for AARP members
Avis: up to 25% off for AARP members
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National Rent-A-Car: up to 30% off for AARP members

Overnight Accommodations:
Holiday Inn: 20-40% off depending on location (62+)
Best Western: 40% off (55+)
Cambria Suites: 20%-30% off (60+)
Waldorf Astoria – NYC $5,000 off nightly rate for Presidential Suite (55 +)
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Comfort Inn: 20%-30% off (60+)
Comfort Suites: 20%-30% off (60+)
Econo Lodge: 40% off (60+)
Hampton Inns & Suites: 40% off when booked 72 hours in advance
Hyatt Hotels: 25%-50% off (62+)
InterContinental Hotels Group: various discounts at all hotels (65+)
Mainstay Suites: 10% off with Mature Traveler’s Discount (50+); 20%-30% off (60+)
Marriott Hotels: 25% off (62+)
Motel 6: Stay Free Sunday nights (60+)
Myrtle Beach Resort: 30% off ( 55 +)
Quality Inn: 40%-50% off (60+)
Rodeway Inn: 20%-30% off (60+)
Sleep Inn: 40% off (60+)

AMC Theaters: up to 30% off ( 55 +)
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Busch Gardens Tampa, FL: $13 off one-day tickets ( 50 +)
Carmike Cinemas: 35% off (65+)
Cinemark/Century Theaters: up to 35% off
Massage Envy – NYC 20% off all “Happy Endings” (62 +)
U.S. National Parks: $10 lifetime pass; 50% off additional services including camping (62+)
Regal Cinemas: 50% off Ripley’s Believe it or Not: @ off one-day ticket ( 55 +)
SeaWorld, Orlando , FL : $3 off one-day tickets ( 50 +)

AT&T: Special Senior Nation 200 Plan $19.99/month (65+)
Jitterbug: $10/month cell phone service ( 50 +)
Verizon Wireless: Verizon Nationwide 65 Plus Plan $29.99/month (65+).

Great Clips: $8 off hair cuts (60+)
Supercuts: $8 off haircuts (60+)